Some of the advantages of early piety

Oct 11, 2017
Charles Spurgeon
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I will just mention some of the advantages of early piety.

To be a believer in God early in life—is to be saved from a thousand regrets! Such a man shall never have to say that he carries in his bones—the sins of his youth. The Christian young man will not fall into the common sins of other young men, and injure his bodily health by excesses.

He will likely marry a Christian woman—and so have a holy companion in his journey towards Heaven.

Early piety helps us to form friendships for the rest of life which will prove helpful—and saves us from those which are harmful. He will select as his associates, the godly from the church—and not the rogues from the tavern. They will be his helpers in virtue—and not his tempters to vice. Depend upon it—a great deal depends upon whom we choose for our companions early in life. If we start in bad company—it is very hard to break away from it.

The man brought to Christ early in life has this further advantage—that he is helped to form holy habits—and is saved from being the slave of sinful ones. Habits soon become second nature; to form new ones is hard work; but those formed in youth— usually remain to old age.

Moreover, I notice that very frequently, those who are brought to Christ while young, grow in grace more rapidly and readily than others do. They have not so much to unlearn—and they have not such a heavy weight of old sinful memories to carry. The scars and bleeding sores which come from having spent years in the service of the devil—are missed by those whom the Lord brings into His church early, before they have wandered far into the sinful pleasures of this evil world.

I cannot commend early piety too highly. How attractive it is! Grace looks loveliest in youth! That which would not be noticed in the grown-up man—strikes at once the most careless observer, when seen in a child. Grace in a child has a convincing force—the infidel drops his weapon and admires. A word spoken by a child abides in the memory, and its artless accents touch the heart. Where the minister’s sermon fails—the child’s prayer may gain the victory!

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